Thursday, September 30, 2010


Powerful Quake Strikes Off Papua, Indonesia

September 30, 2010, 2:33am
JAKARTA (Xinhua) - An earthquake with magnitude of 7. 4 rocked Papua, in easternmost of Indonesia, on Thursday, potential for tsunami, the Meteorology and Geophysics Agency reported. 
The quake struck at 00:10 a.m. Jakarta time Thursday (1710 GMT Wednesday) with epicenter 141 km southeast Kaimana town of Irian Barat in Papua and with the depth 25 km under sea bed, an official of the agency named only Octivar said.
The intensity of the qake was felt at 3 to 4 MMI (modified Mercally Intensity in Tual of Mauku province, he said.   "We have issued a tsunami warning," the official said.
The USGS reported at its web site that the quake was measured at 6.6 magnitude and with the depth at 21.2 km.
Source: http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/279758/powerful-quake-strikes-off-papua-indonesia


Tsunami warning issued after quake off Indonesia

2010-09-30 01:10:00


Jakarta, Sep 29 (DPA) An earthquake measuring 7.4 on the Richter scale rocked Indonesia's easternmost region of Papua early Thursday, prompting a tsunami warning.

The epicentre of the quake was 141 km southeast of Kaimana in West Papua province at a depth of 25 km, according to the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency.

The quake was followed by another measuring 6.8 on the Richter scale off the Aru island group near the Maluku archipelago, the agency said.
'We're still trying to contact West Papua to check whether there has been damage or casualties,' said Andi Arief, a presidential aide in charge of disaster management.

Source: http://sify.com/news/tsunami-warning-issued-after-quake-off-indonesia-news-international-kj4bkeaajff.html
Ministers in Flying Visit to Audit State of Restless Papua
Camelia Pasandaran & Nivell Rayda | September 29, 2010



Jakarta. President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has dispatched his three coordinating ministers and their officials on a quick trip to Papua as part of his promised audit of conditions in the troubled province. 

He told them to use their two-day trip to evaluate the implementation of his 2007 instruction to accelerate development and improve people’s welfare in Papua. 

Yudhoyono said the central government had to ensure that the necessary programs and policies were being implemented by the governor and the regional governments. 

HRW's torture reports may have been fabricated: Govt

Dicky Christanto, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Fri, 06/25/2010 11:38 AM | Headlines
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The Justice and Human Rights Ministry plans to take action on reports alleging the torture of Ambonese and Papuan prisoners arrested by the National Police's Detachment 88 antiterrorist squad, for having waved banned flags at rallies.
"If the torture really occurred, report it to me," Justice and Human Rights Minister Patrialis Akbar said Thursday, adding that torturing people, particularly prisoners, was a serious violation of human rights that could not be justified under Indonesian law.
However, according to Haris Azhar from Kontras, Human Rights Watch (HRW) had reported the case to the Directorate of Correctional Institutions under the ministry, but the report had been rejected.
Autonomy failing in West Papua

Tom Allard, Jakarta
September 4, 2010

A CONSENSUS is emerging in Indonesia that special autonomy for the fractious province of West Papua has failed.

Among Indonesian military advisers, policy analysts and the indigenous population of the resource-rich region, there is near unanimity that the policy introduced almost 10 years ago to placate separatist sentiment has deepened discontent. And few agree on how to fix it.

International Crisis Group Jakarta-based analyst Sidney Jones said as part of a dialogue to address discontent and frustration, the government must apologise for the manipulated vote in 1969 that led to Papua's inclusion in the republic.

Groups Urge Obama Administration to Reject Dino Patti Djalal as Indonesia's Ambassador

Contact: John M. Miller (ETAN) 718-596-7668
Ed McWilliams (WPAT) 401-568-5845 (until Sept. 21), 575-648-2078 (after)


September 15, 2010 - The East Timor and Indonesia Action Network (ETAN) and West Papua Advocacy Team (WPAT) are deeply concerned about the appointment of Dino Patti Djalal as the Indonesia's Ambassador-designate to the United States. We urge President Obama to reject his credentials and urge Jakarta to send an Ambassador untainted by complicity with human rights violations and with greater credibility.

Dino Patti Djalal Ambassador Djalal was a defender of the Suharto dictatorship, and his career involved him in brutal repression. While defending the Indonesian security forces in East Timor (now independent Timor-Leste), he would often attack human rights investigators and organizations. He sought to portray the violence there as civil conflict among East Timorese, rather than resulting from repression of resistance to Indonesia's illegal and brutal occupation.

The Suharto dictatorship and the Habibie government that followed promoted Djalal as Indonesia's leading "expert" on East Timor. During that time, Djalal reportedly had close links with the Indonesian army's intelligence agency.

all photos by John M. Miller/ETAN

Preliminary Transcript of September 22, 2010 Congressional Hearing on West Papua


Federal News Service
September 22, 2010 Wednesday

HEARING OF THE ASIA, THE PACIFIC AND THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE FOREIGN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

SUBJECT: "CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY: WHEN WILL INDONESIA'S MILITARY BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR DELIBERATE AND SYSTEMATIC ABUSES IN WEST PAPUA?";
CHAIRED BY: DELEGATE ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA (D-AS);
WITNESSESJOSEPH Y. YUN, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EAST ASIAN AND PACIFIC AFFAIRS; ROBERT SCHER, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA, ASIAN AND PACIFIC SECURITY AFFAIRS; PIETER DROOGLEVER, PH.D., PROFESSOR EMERITUS, INSTITUTE OF NETHERLANDS HISTORY; OCTOVIANUS MOTE, FOUNDER, WEST PAPUA ACTION NETWORK, PRESIDENT, PAPUA RESOURCE CENTER; HENKIE RUMBEWAS, INTERNATIONAL ADVOCATE, AUSTRALIA WEST PAPUA ASSOCIATION (AWPA); NICHOLAS SIMEONE MESSET, WEST PAPUA; SALAMON MAURITIS YUMAME, HEAD OF FORDEM (THE DEMOCRATIC FORUM); S. EBEN KIRKSEY, PH.D., VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, THE GRADUATE CENTER, THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK; SOPHIE RICHARDSON, PH.D., ASIA ADVOCACY CENTER, HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH;
LOCATION: 2172 RAYBURN HOUSE OFFICE BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Written testimony for the 9/22/10 Hearing on West Papua by the Subcommittee on Asia, The Pacific and the Global Environment

offered by Edmund McWilliams , U.S. Senior Foreign Service (retired)

It is timely and entirely appropriate that the Congress through this hearing undertakes to shed light on the complex and ominous developments affecting security and the human rights environment in West Papua.  Ongoing security force repression of peaceful political dissent, military operations that pose life threatening displacement of civilians and systematic abuse of political prisoners combine to raise fundamental doubts about democracy in West Papua and more broadly in Indonesia.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Timika initiates urban community-based waste management

NATIONAL

Timika initiates urban community-based waste management

Markus Makur, The Jakarta Post, Timika | Fri, 05/22/2009 1:23 PM | National
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The newly established Mimika Sanitation, Spatial Planning and Park Agency (KPT) is initiating a concept on waste management aimed at cleaning garbage strewn along the major roads in the regency capital of Timika.
The urban community waste management system is designed for people living in Timika and the surrounding areas. Sanitation workers will collect garbage door-to-door with trucks every morning beginning at 5 a.m. local time.
In the door-to-door service, residents are involved in handling their household waste.
The sanitation agency will remove the dumpsters placed along the major roads in Timika and in turn provide garbage bins around residential areas to facilitate waste disposal and transportation by sanitary workers.

Palm Oil Plantation Project Rejected

Sunday, September 26, 2010 10:53 AM

THE ARCHIPELAGO


Palm oil plantation project rejected


Markus Makur, The Jakarta Post, Timika | Fri, 09/17/2010 9:47 AM | The Archipelago A | A | A |
The Timika church in Mimika, Papua, has voiced its opposition of the province’s planned oil palm plantation project, arguing that it would damage the environment and lead to a shortage of sago, the staple food of the Papuan Kamoro indigenous people.

Timika bishop Mgr. John Philiph Saklil said the establishment of an oil palm plantation was feared to make the area prone to flooding as the project would begin with clear-felling the forest, including sago plants.

Friday, September 17, 2010

Indonesia’s far east: security and politics


A tide of protest in Indonesia’s easternmost provinces of Papua and West Papua is a challenge to Jakarta, says Charles Reading: find a new security paradigm, or face increasing radicalism in the country’s poorest region. 
 
About the author
Charles Reading is the pseudonym of a Jakarta-based security analyst
Indonesia’s two easternmost provinces, Papua and West Papua, are facing a deepening political impasse whose heart is the denial of local people’s  political aspirations. Indeed, while Indonesia’s continued economic growth, democratisation and achievement of peace in Aceh have earned it well-deserved praise, the continuing grievances in these two provinces are a tragic reminder of its violent past.

The western half of the island of New Guinea, where the two provinces are located, has remained in a state of simmering conflict since their inclusion into Indonesia in 1969; they remain the poorest in Indonesia.
Aside from genuine and well-grounded discontent, as a whole the Papua situation also suffers from a lack of constructive national and international debate (see "Papua: the elusive dialogue", 23 April 2010). The provinces are often analysed through a simplifying dichotomy - “pro-Indonesia” vs “pro-Papuan independence” - that is rooted in the controversial Act of Free Choice of 1969.

The reality in the two easternmost provinces is, however, much more complex than this. The most recent Papuan demonstrations demanding a referendum on independence show that a nuanced dynamic is at work, hinging on an interaction between grievances, local populist activism, and Jakarta’s own actions (and inactions).

NATIONAL

Papua proposes 500,000 hectares for food estate: Minister

The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Mon, 09/13/2010 9:17 AM | National
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Forestry Minister Zulkifli Hasan said his ministry received a proposal to make use of 500,000 hectare areas for the 1.6-million-hectare food and energy estate projects planned in Merauke, Papua.

He said half of the proposed area could be planted directly since it was not in forested areas that have been allocated for other business aims.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Another Strange Statement on Land Issues in Papua!!!!!!!!??????@@@@@??????

NATIONAL

Papua proposes 500,000 hectares for food estate: Minister

The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Mon, 09/13/2010 9:17 AM | National
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Forestry Minister Zulkifli Hasan said his ministry received a proposal to make use of 500,000 hectare areas for the 1.6-million-hectare food and energy estate projects planned in Merauke, Papua.

He said half of the proposed area could be planted directly since it was not in forested areas that have been allocated for other business aims.

“We are still assessing the remaining 250,000 hectares to ensure whether they are located in peatland or natural forest areas,” Zulkifli said recently.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

A "Great" Picture of Government's Consistency in Good Governance in Papua

THE ARCHIPELAGO

Graft suspect wins reelection in Papua

Nethy Dharma Somba, The Jakarta Post, Jayapura | Wed, 09/08/2010 9:40 AM | The Archipelago
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Graft suspect Yusak Yaluwo looks set to be reelected as Boven Digoel Regent in Papua, a day before the regency’s General Elections Commission (KPUD) officially announces the vote results on Wednesday.

Head of the Boven Digoel KPUD, Christian Guamn, told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday that the vote count had been approved in every district and that the winner would be officially announced in a plenary session Wednesday.

Indonesia and the challenge of Papuan separatism

Institute for Defence Studies and Analysis [India]
August 25, 2010

IDSA COMMENT
Indonesia and the challenge of Papuan separatism

Bilveer Singh


Introduction

If there are any symbols of Papuans’ continued quest and determination for sovereign independence1, it is their continued attachment to their flag, the Morning Star or Bintang Kejora (in Indonesian), their Anthem, Hai Tanahku Papua (in Indonesian) or Oh, My Land Papua, written by a Dutch missionary in the 1930s and the continued existence of the OPM, Papua Independence Movement since 1964. The Morning Star was first formally unveiled on 1 December 1961, symbolising the onset of the Republic of West Papua and flew till October 1962, when the former Dutch colony was transferred to the United Nations Temporary Executive Authority through a deal brokered by the United States, mainly to prevent Indonesia from joining the Soviet Camp during the Cold War. Indonesia took control of the territory in the following year and formally incorporated West Papua, renamed West Irian, into Indonesia in 1969, recognised by the United Nations. However, Papuans have continued to challenge the territory’s integration into Indonesia and a bloody struggle has ensued ever since, with supporters of Papuan independence claiming that more than 100,000 Papuans have been killed by the Indonesian military. The violence has continued right to the present period and it remains illegal to fly the Bintang Kejora in Indonesia and many Papuans continue to be incarcerated for doing so. 

Anatomy of Papua

Located on the easternmost part of Indonesia, geographically it constitutes one-fifth of the country but only has a population of 3 million (of which the natives constitute only 50 per cent). Indonesia, where 90 per cent of the people are Muslim, has a population of nearly 240 million. Papua is a largely Christian territory, where the Protestants constitute the majority, followed by the Catholics and then Muslims. However, tribalism is extremely dominant with more than 265 tribes representing the Putra Daerah or Sons of the Soil (natives). Yet, the territory is extremely rich in natural resources, especially oil, gas, gold and copper. It is also geo-strategically important, bordering on land with Papua New Guinea and fronting the Pacific Ocean.
Explaining Papuans’ Desire for Independence

Even though Indonesia declared independence in August 1945 and had to fight the Dutch to gain complete sovereignty in December 1949, the Dutch only surrendered Papua in October 1962. This represents an important historical anomaly as Papua remained for another 12 years as a Dutch colony compared to the rest of Indonesia. This provided the Dutch ample time to develop a local Papuan elite that was committed to independence and hence the importance of the Morning Star, National Anthem, not to mention a rudimentary Parliament that was formed in Jayapura in 1961. However, due to the Cold War, President Kennedy succeeded in pressurising the Dutch to surrender the territory in 1962 and Indonesia, with the support of the West, legitimately gained control of the territory by 1969. However, this was largely undertaken against the wishes of the Papuan elites and hence the continued struggle for Merdeka or independence ever since.

From the perspective of Papuans, there are a number of grievances that have provided a catalyst and triggered their demands for independence. First, the sense of historical injustice when Papua was handed over to Indonesia by the Dutch in 1962 without consulting Papuan elites and later, the fraudulent manner in which the referendum, called Act of Free Choice (but what the Papuans call Act of No Choice) was held in 1969. Thus, for the Papuans, Indonesia is an illegal colonizer and the territory’s status should be reviewed through a referendum. Second, gross unhappiness in the manner Jakarta has flooded the territory with non-Papuans, mostly Muslims, thereby creating what Papuans refer to as ‘demographic and cultural genocide’ and where they are fast becoming minorities in their own land. This has also intensified social-cultural conflicts between the natives (Putra Daerah) and the transmigrants (Pendatangs), the latter usually backed by officialdom.

Third, demographically, Papuans feel discriminated against, with the majority Malay Indonesians looking down on the Melanesian Papuans (for their dress code, eating and drinking habits, etc) and worst still, most privileges being given to the former at the expense of the latter.

Friday, September 3, 2010

Foreign NGOs Existence in Papua is Questioned by GoI


NATIONAL

RI still open to foreign NGOs in Papua

Abdul Khalik, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Sat, 08/07/2010 11:42 AM | National
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Indonesia still opens its door to NGOs that want to operate in Papua, as long as they benefit the people without involvement in politics and commercial activities, an official says.
Sunu M. Soemarno, director for Socio-Culture and International Organizations at the Foreign Ministry, said the government through an inter-department meeting including his office, the Social Services Ministry and intelligence bodies, police and the State Secretariat, will decide and review whether NGOs can help build Papua.
He said if the meeting found that NGOs could benefit the province, without embarking on political activities supporting separatism or violating agreements agreed upon beforehand with ministry partners, the government would hand out permits or extend permits to NGOs. "We have approved the operation of 14 foreign NGOs in Papua while we expand scope of operations for two others based on this criteria."

Following a decision to terminate permits of Cordaid, a Dutch funding organization, to operate in Papua, Sunu said based on input from other departments, the organization had violated its agreement with its government partner, the Social Services Ministry, by being a shareholder of Bank Andara and sponsoring the participation of a community group in the Initiatives for International Dialogue (IID), a forum that supports secessionist movements in southern Thailand, Myanmar, the Philippines and Indonesia.
The government requested Cordaid, which has operated for 30 years in Indonesia, to hand over ongoing projects to its local partners and not expand the scope of the projects or extend deadlines. "I have met with Cordaid's officials, and we have discussed the matter. They have regretted their mistakes, but said it was a misunderstanding as they did not know the purpose of the dialogue they sponsored.
"From my perspective, they are sincere, and until this incident, they have no record of causing problems. But, we can't cancel the letter *ceasing their permit* as the process is already underway," Sunu said. He added that Cordaid, however, could reapply for the permit, and provide evidence to the Social Services Ministry that the organization had no intention of supporting separatism, and that its operation in Indonesia had provided many benefits to Papuans. "The Social Services Ministry can take it to the inter-department meeting to be discussed, with opposing parties able to present their argument and new data. Based on this discussion, we can decide whether it can resume its operation."
Cordaid said in its letter to the Social Services Ministry that it never supported separatist activities, while asserting it had gradually relinquished its 10 percent share in Andara.

Thursday, September 2, 2010

AWPA



AWPA

Australia West Papua Association The following statement is made on behalf and with endorsement of the Australia West Papua Assoction of Darwin, WA (Western Australia), Sydney, Melbourne, and Newcastle.

West Papua - in the international context
West Papua's international context is simple, it is a colony. Without the people's consent they were traded by the Netherlands during 1962 in a US drafted contract1. Although NGO reports such as the Yale Law School's 2004 "Indonesian Human Rights Abuses in West Papua: Application of the Law of Genocide to the History of Indonesian Control" result from Indonesian abuse of human rights, the Papuan people know that injustices including Indonesia denial of free speech and the mining license of the American company Freeport since 1967 are aspects of traditional colonialism.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Population growth ‘good for Papua’? Whose good? Who benefits from the population growth?

Population growth ‘good for Papua’

The Jakarta Post | Mon, 08/23/2010 9:55 AM | Headlines
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This is part of a series based on the preliminary report of the 2010 census, as recently announced by the Central Statistics Agency (BPS).
In the past decade, the combined population of Papua and West Papua has grown 64 percent, making them the provinces with the fastest population growth in Indonesia.
The preliminary report of the nation’s 2010 census reveals that Papua and West Papua’s populations now stand at around 2.9 million and 761,000, respectively, or about 3.6 million people combined.